The story of bohemian glass

published by Lasvit

Art of creation • Glass Cutting

VI

Glass Cutting

The most common method of mechanically shaping glass is cutting, which flourished in the 18th century Europe. At this time, Bohemia, or today’s Czech Republic, became the world’s capital of quality glass with intricate geometric ornaments cut into the surface, sometimes called Bohemian Crystal. Chandeliers made from this glass could (and still can) be found at the most opulent and important European courts, including Vienna, Paris and St. Petersburg. Cutting has three crucial phases. Rough cutting involves adjusting the size of the glass piece to the desired size of the object. Fine cutting smooths the surface of glass using natural materials such as sandstone and removes any mechanical traces of the rough cut. The third step is to chemically and mechanically polish the cut surface of the glass so that it visually corresponds with the rest of the product. The technique of cutting most efficiently employs the refractory properties of glass, either by altering the shape of the piece or geometrically embellishing its surface and allowing light to perform its little dance on it. The traditional ornamental cut known from Bohemian Crystal is still a technical blueprint for many companies. Lasvit’s artists are also successfully investigating ways of using the best of the old craft to find innovative and impressively modern patterns.

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I

Lasvit tradition

The meticulous approach of the Czech glassmaking pioneer.

II

Mold making

The preparation of glass molds from Beechwood.

III

Glass Preparation

Creation of the ideal glass mixture.

IV

The Glassmaking Process

The journey from solid ingrediences to work of art.

V

Glassblowing

Breathing of life into the product.

VI

Glass Cutting

The most common method of mechanically shaping glass.

VII

Packaging of the Product

Sheltering of the final product for expedition.

VIII

Transporting the Product

Reaching the preferred destinations safely.

IX

Installation

The entire process of completing a lighting sculpture may take weeks or even months.

X

Supplement

Glass, in its historic context and future development, contributes to the very foundation of humanity.

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VI

Glass Cutting

The most common method of mechanically shaping glass.

I

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